Little Bighorn Battlefield, Montana

A new technical paper on Little Bighorn Battlefield is ready for readers.  Just released.  Abstract of paper is  shown below.  This technical paper is a preprint on deposit in the Institutional Repository at The University of Alabama.

URL:  https://t.co/V79tmSlcL7


Characterization of Geographical Aspects of the Landscape and Environment in the Area of the Little Bighorn Battlefield, Montana

John H. Sandy

 Abstract:  On June 24, 1876, a large military force of the United States Army 7th Cavalry converged on the lower Little Bighorn Valley in the Montana Territory, aiming to capture a large number of Native Americans.  A major military battle ensued over the following two days.  The landscape near the Little Bighorn Battlefield is both gentle and very rugged.  The upland to the east of the Little Bighorn Valley is highly dissected by a complex drainage system, consisting of ravines, coulees, and ridges.  Elevations from the valley floor to the upland change as much as 340 feet.  The slope in parts of the upland is greater than 10 degrees, and in rugged areas of the bluffs and along some ravines and other erosional features in excess of 30 degrees. The Little Bighorn Valley itself is a gentle northward sloping plain, with the Little Bighorn River flowing to the east side of the valley adjacent to the upland.  Local vegetation of the area is highly diverse, bearing a close relationship to the physiographic features, hydrology, and climate of this area.  Certain characteristics of the Little Bighorn River and the bordering riparian zone add to the diversity of the landscape.  A brief analysis suggests ways that elements of the landscape and environment affected the course of the battle.

Keywords:   Little Bighorn Battlefield, physiography, weather, topography, vegetation, Montana, military history, Lakota Sioux, Northern Cheyenne, U.S. Army, George Custer, Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull